Tag: productivity

I had always planned to write about my experiences (or lack of) while going through the Dry18 challenge. I’d have a bit more time on my hands, so decided early on to keep a journal along the way! Initially, it was for my eyes only. When I put together the first 100 days piece, it was more for me than anyone else. I very nearly didn’t post it at all. I always tend to have that internal battle, the voice inside the head shouting at me, providing me with many reasons not to. I experienced the same sense of resistance before releasing podcasts or videos too sometimes. But, I can’t let that stop me, and I’m glad I didn’t again with that piece.

The response from it was, and still is, very positive. It’s always nice to hear from friends that it connected with. It’s also nice to hear from people you don’t know that it resonated with too. In many ways, that’ even more powerful. So, when Maddy Lawson, from Alcohol Concern UK got in touch, to say the article was something they’d like to share, I was delighted. It made it all worthwhile. Even better, Maddy asked if me I’d be interested in putting out a series of posts over the rest of the year on the Dry18 adventure. I was delighted to oblige. She suggested that I start with one that gives a bit more detail on my backstory and why give up alcohol at all. So, I put together the following piece to give some context on my ‘why’. I hope you enjoy it.


My relationship with alcohol has been what you might call quintessentially Irish in nature. I don’t drink Guinness (often), but ‘the drink’ has been part of my life for a long time.

I think I had my first drink at the age of 16. The guilt of breaking my confirmation pledge still sometimes floats into my mind (and has just now as I write this). For the first year, it was the occasional alcopop on a Saturday night (didn’t like the taste of anything else). Then one night, that all changed. I was introduced to whiskey. That was the first night that I got ‘drunk’.

For the following 23 or so years, alcohol has always been a part of my life – sometimes a big part. Too big. It was a prominent feature during my college nights (and sometimes mornings) in Galway. Throughout the rest of my twenties nights out, weddings, holidays, and any other social occasion always had a ‘session’ at the epicentre. Even sporting activities, like playing for my local football team, where you’d think getting and keeping fit was the main objective, had booze as a key component. We would often celebrate victories (and defeats) after the match on the Saturday, often into the Sunday, and I seem to recall a couple of Mondays too. Hardcore.

Somehow, I was able to juggle a busy work life with the busier social life and, for the vast majority of the time, I kept the show on the road.

I’m not hungover, I just got something in my eye!

While all this was ‘only a bit of fun’, the pain of the recovery after a heavy weekend, where I may not feel 100% again until Wednesday or Thursday, was outweighing the fun. That was a sign, but one that I mostly chose to ignore until I hit my thirties. I didn’t have the self-awareness to realise, or maybe the confidence to make the change.

Then in 2008, I did. Job cuts where I worked, with the Big Crash looming, gave me an opportunity to leave with a few €uros in my pocket. I hit reboot, moving jobs and cities. My relationship with alcohol started to change too. Sure, they say don’t run away from your challenges, but sometimes a change of environment does help. And it did for me.

Flash forward to 2017. I’d been living in Cork nine great years. I had settled in great with the city, the people and the culture. Work was fulfilling and I was in good place. I had made a lot of positive adjustments in my life, running half marathons, cycling and eating better. Developing a practice for Meditation was a big deal for me too. Lots more on that on the blog page.

Over the years, my relationship with drinking had softened but never completely stopped. There were still a few occasions each year when I’d drink far too much, and I’d feel demotivated and down for a few days as a result. As someone who loves to get the most of my time outside of work, being hungover on a Sunday had a double negative impact on my mood; not only was I feeling like crap as a result of the booze, I was missing out on getting good stuff done in my time off!

I had often contemplated going off drink 100%, but never been able to commit. But as my own life was getting busier, I just had no time for or interest in spending any time with a hangover. Developing Type 1 Diabetes at 35 was an additional wake-up call. I had a lot of incentives to make me want to quit. I just needed do some experimenting.

Dry January is a Great place to start!

First up was Dry January in 2017. That was a relative breeze. I came through with flying colours. I learned that going dry wasn’t so bad – the opposite in fact.

Then, on the weekend of my 40thbirthday in November 2017, despite great fun and celebrations, I knew there was gloom and doom lurking around the corner. After two days/nights ‘enjoying’ myself, I felt like enough was enough. As we wrapped up the Sunday night, my friend Richie and I started to pick into the ridiculousness of our boozing and how it would impact our mood for the next few days. Richie started to explain how he heard a guy on the radio the week before detailing how he had given up drink two years earlier.

So, as this conversation developed, both Richie and I started to play with the idea of going off drink. Before we knew it, the idea of a Dry18 was born. Both of us are pretty stubborn so when we make a commitment, we tend to stick with it. We added in some financial incentives that a charity would gain from if either of us were to break. The bet, even though made after numerous pints, gave me a lift.

And so it came to be, that, at midnight on 31 December 2017, Dry 18 officially came into being. It felt right. I like to set goals at the start of every year and try to make them SMART, which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timebound. This one had all of these ingredients (even if my friends and family questioned the ‘achievable’ part). Plus I had a big incentive: zero days wasted in 2018 as a result of a hangover.

Testing SMART Goals to the limit

While the goal was exciting, I was under no illusion that it would be easy. Jumping from 31 days in January to 365 days is a bit of a leap. But I wanted the challenge and knew it would be the perfect year to try this out. With huge optimism, and a clear plan of attack for the year in place, I was ready for 2018. Time to walk the walk.

The article is posted on the Alcohol Concern blog page also here.


Rob is a qualified Executive Coach. In 2017, Rob launched the Rob of the Green Platform which hosts the 1% Better Podcast. Rob also publishes articles on productivity, goal setting, meditation, and other topics. Rob is currently a director of strategy and business operations with Dell IT in Cork, Ireland.

Connect with Rob via,email, twitter, Facebook or his website.

Check out all the great work that Alcohol Research UK are doing here

I had always planned to write about my experiences (or lack of) while going through the Dry18 challenge. I’d have a bit more time on my hands, so decided early on to keep a journal along the way! Initially, it was for my eyes only. When I put together the first 100 days piece, it was more for me than anyone else. I very nearly didn’t post it at all. I always tend to have that internal battle, the voice inside the head shouting at me, providing me with many reasons not to. I experienced the same sense of resistance before releasing podcasts or videos too sometimes. But, I can’t let that stop me, and I’m glad I didn’t again with that piece.

The response from it was, and still is, very positive. It’s always nice to hear from friends that it connected with. It’s also nice to hear from people you don’t know that it resonated with too. In many ways, that’ even more powerful. So, when Maddy Lawson, from Alcohol Concern UK got in touch, to say the article was something they’d like to share, I was delighted. It made it all worthwhile. Even better, Maddy asked if me I’d be interested in putting out a series of posts over the rest of the year on the Dry18 adventure. I was delighted to oblige. She suggested that I start with one that gives a bit more detail on my backstory and why give up alcohol at all. So, I put together the following piece to give some context on my ‘why’. I hope you enjoy it.


My relationship with alcohol has been what you might call quintessentially Irish in nature. I don’t drink Guinness (often), but ‘the drink’ has been part of my life for a long time.

I think I had my first drink at the age of 16. The guilt of breaking my confirmation pledge still sometimes floats into my mind (and has just now as I write this). For the first year, it was the occasional alcopop on a Saturday night (didn’t like the taste of anything else). Then one night, that all changed. I was introduced to whiskey. That was the first night that I got ‘drunk’.

For the following 23 or so years, alcohol has always been a part of my life – sometimes a big part. Too big. It was a prominent feature during my college nights (and sometimes mornings) in Galway. Throughout the rest of my twenties nights out, weddings, holidays, and any other social occasion always had a ‘session’ at the epicentre. Even sporting activities, like playing for my local football team, where you’d think getting and keeping fit was the main objective, had booze as a key component. We would often celebrate victories (and defeats) after the match on the Saturday, often into the Sunday, and I seem to recall a couple of Mondays too. Hardcore.

Somehow, I was able to juggle a busy work life with the busier social life and, for the vast majority of the time, I kept the show on the road.

I’m not hungover, I just got something in my eye!

While all this was ‘only a bit of fun’, the pain of the recovery after a heavy weekend, where I may not feel 100% again until Wednesday or Thursday, was outweighing the fun. That was a sign, but one that I mostly chose to ignore until I hit my thirties. I didn’t have the self-awareness to realise, or maybe the confidence to make the change.

Then in 2008, I did. Job cuts where I worked, with the Big Crash looming, gave me an opportunity to leave with a few €uros in my pocket. I hit reboot, moving jobs and cities. My relationship with alcohol started to change too. Sure, they say don’t run away from your challenges, but sometimes a change of environment does help. And it did for me.

Flash forward to 2017. I’d been living in Cork nine great years. I had settled in great with the city, the people and the culture. Work was fulfilling and I was in good place. I had made a lot of positive adjustments in my life, running half marathons, cycling and eating better. Developing a practice for Meditation was a big deal for me too. Lots more on that on the blog page.

Over the years, my relationship with drinking had softened but never completely stopped. There were still a few occasions each year when I’d drink far too much, and I’d feel demotivated and down for a few days as a result. As someone who loves to get the most of my time outside of work, being hungover on a Sunday had a double negative impact on my mood; not only was I feeling like crap as a result of the booze, I was missing out on getting good stuff done in my time off!

I had often contemplated going off drink 100%, but never been able to commit. But as my own life was getting busier, I just had no time for or interest in spending any time with a hangover. Developing Type 1 Diabetes at 35 was an additional wake-up call. I had a lot of incentives to make me want to quit. I just needed do some experimenting.

Dry January is a Great place to start!

First up was Dry January in 2017. That was a relative breeze. I came through with flying colours. I learned that going dry wasn’t so bad – the opposite in fact.

Then, on the weekend of my 40thbirthday in November 2017, despite great fun and celebrations, I knew there was gloom and doom lurking around the corner. After two days/nights ‘enjoying’ myself, I felt like enough was enough. As we wrapped up the Sunday night, my friend Richie and I started to pick into the ridiculousness of our boozing and how it would impact our mood for the next few days. Richie started to explain how he heard a guy on the radio the week before detailing how he had given up drink two years earlier.

So, as this conversation developed, both Richie and I started to play with the idea of going off drink. Before we knew it, the idea of a Dry18 was born. Both of us are pretty stubborn so when we make a commitment, we tend to stick with it. We added in some financial incentives that a charity would gain from if either of us were to break. The bet, even though made after numerous pints, gave me a lift.

And so it came to be, that, at midnight on 31 December 2017, Dry 18 officially came into being. It felt right. I like to set goals at the start of every year and try to make them SMART, which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timebound. This one had all of these ingredients (even if my friends and family questioned the ‘achievable’ part). Plus I had a big incentive: zero days wasted in 2018 as a result of a hangover.

Testing SMART Goals to the limit

While the goal was exciting, I was under no illusion that it would be easy. Jumping from 31 days in January to 365 days is a bit of a leap. But I wanted the challenge and knew it would be the perfect year to try this out. With huge optimism, and a clear plan of attack for the year in place, I was ready for 2018. Time to walk the walk.

The article is posted on the Alcohol Concern blog page also here.


Rob is a qualified Executive Coach. In 2017, Rob launched the Rob of the Green Platform which hosts the 1% Better Podcast. Rob also publishes articles on productivity, goal setting, meditation, and other topics. Rob is currently a director of strategy and business operations with Dell IT in Cork, Ireland.

Connect with Rob via,email, twitter, Facebook or his website.

Check out all the great work that Alcohol Research UK are doing here

The 11th April 2018 marked the 100th day of 2018! During that period, we’ve experienced (in Ireland at least) the #BeastfromtheEast 1, 2 & 3 (was there a 4th ?) and a winter that seems to have lasted for roughly 18 months. It’s not all been bad though. For me, it marked a milestone on my #Dry18 challenge. To go 365 Days without any beer, wine, or any other alcohol related tipple. I’ve had some positive new learnings and experiences too. So, I decided to mark the first 100 days of the journey with a retrospective on what I’ve learned since I had my last sip of beer (at around 8:32pm) on 31st December 2017. With #DryJanuary in 2017  being a relatively easy month, I decided to over 10X that and go for the full year. I felt I knew what to expect. I was still curious to see how though the first few months would turn out to be. In no particular order of significance, here are 7 stand-out observations and learnings.

  1. The forbidden fruit (in this case drink) must NOT be tasted!

First off, I’m still on track. Over 100 days done. I’ve learned I can do this. I was very staunchly no-beer from the outset. I even considered non-alcoholic beer off the table at the start of the year. But after consulting with  my #Dry18 partner, Richie McCaffrey, who felt non-alcoholic beer was ‘ok’, I allowed it. You’re probably thinking ‘it’s non-alcoholic’ but there is still a trace of a percentage in some of the ones out there. A barman reassured me that there was a similar amount of alcohol in mouthwash. These guys know what they’re talking about. So, while there have been a number of times that the temptation was there, at no point did I give in. I now know I can do this. Well, the first 100 days part at least.

  1. We talk about drinking A LOT!

When I wasn’t on a self-imposed alcohol ban, it never struck me how often alcohol or drinking comes up in conversation. It’s just not something I was that aware of when it wasn’t off the table. But, when you’re dry, you begin to hear how intertwined it is in conversation and how much it’s a key part of socializing. Maybe I’m stating the obvious. It’s certainly amplified when it’s off-limits. It’s somewhat analogous to the situation you might find yourself in when looking for a new car. You identify a model that takes your fancy. One weren’t aware existed before. Now you have this awareness of it and, ever since, it’s the only car you see on the road. They are, literally, everywhere. Ok, what is called the ‘frequency illusion‘ maybe a poor analogy here, but my learning is that drink is still very much engrained in our consciousness. It may have been even more focal 10 years ago. Before the coffee shop boom, the pubs, instead of Starbucks, were busy on a Tuesday evening. That’s progress I guess.

  1. Three Perspectives

So, I have to be clear. At the point of starting out on the #dry18 challenge, I considered myself very much in control of my alcoholic consumption. Much more so than I was 10 years ago. So, going into it, my reasons for doing it were more to squeeze more out of my days and weekends than to detox. However, so far, it’s been very interesting to see what others reaction to is has been. I’ve generally observed three responses.

The most common reactions was a raised eyebrow and a sense that the person I was talking with might have thought I had a problem upon hearing I was ‘off the drink’. At which point, I’d find myself having to give a detailed explanation as to why I’m doing it. I noticed I was having to be explicit and clarify that I didn’t have a drinking problem. That seemed to be the default place many folks were going to when hearing I was giving it up for the year.  The irony here is that I’d never been more in control of alcohol intake than I was leading up to the crafting of the bet.

The second most common response was it’s just a bad idea in general! To deprive yourself of a relaxing wine or beer over a meal or at the weekend doesn’t make sense to a good section of those I know. When you’re in control of it already, why deprive yourself? Fair point & one I’m probably in most alignment with now!

The third and final category turned out to be more frequent than I expected. Those that think it’s a great idea and have confided in me that it’s something that they’d love to do themselves. It’s probably the stage of life many are at. Around the 40 mark and keen to curtail or stop drinking altogether. That the downside or after effects outweigh the upside of a few drinks being the general view.

It’s been interesting to see these different perspectives. Even in this short time, I’ve become a lot more relaxed saying ‘no thanks, I’m on the dry’, without having to give the backstory. Progress for sure.

  1. Freedom through Commitment

For the last 22+ years, my self-imposed ban probably lasted 4-5 weeks max. Prior to Dry January in 2017, I hadn’t abstained much. So, going into the start of the year, I was interested to see how this experiment would play out. What I’ve learned about my own decision making over the last few years has played out again with this challenge. It can take me a long time to make a decision or commit to something. Especially when it’s a big one. But once I made a decision, and also opt to tell everyone I know about it (whether they care or not), it really ups my level of accountability to it.

This has been very true for #Dry18. Without question, I’ve had a few really shit days so far in 2018. Days that would have, in 2017, 100% lead to a bottle of red wine in the evening, just because I could. No real justification needed either. With that choice off the table, I just had to look for an alternative activity to focus on. Which I did. That has been a big learning. Maybe validation is a better word.

  1. St. Patricks Day Overthinking! 

Probably the most notorious day in the Irish drinking calendar is that of our patron Saint, Patrick. The 17th of March is typically the day where a large percentage of our population celebrate. It’s a day for the pubs and a lot of Guinness or whatever your favourite tipple might be. Some even manage to get drunk twice in the same day. So, it was to be expected that I’d see this as the first big challenge to my 2018 sobriety.

As it transpired, this St. Patrick’s Day was to be a 4-pronged attack. I had a Friend’s 40th Birthday to attend. If that wasn’t bad enough, the location was to be Galway. Anyone that has been to the city of the tribes knows that it’s not a quiet place. Finally, to really put the icing on the cake, the Irish Rugby team were playing their last game of their Grand Slam winning 6 Nations against the old enemy England. Kicking off. At 2:30pm. On St. Patricks day. The 4-leafed clover was complete. Arriving in Galway in time for the match kick-off meant I had a solid 10 hours in packed pubs ahead. I had this already played out in my head as a big struggle!

My anxiety levels were at their highest in the minutes after arriving into the packed pub before the game started. In truth, even when I was drinking, these initial moments would always have been somewhat uneasy. Being more on the introverted side, a crowed bar in the early afternoon would make me a little edgy. In the past, I’d have masked this with a couple of quick pints in the first hour to ‘settle in’ to the atmosphere. That was the norm. This time around, I had a couple of non-alcoholic beers, and started to chat one-to-one. I must say the placebo effect of just having what looked like a beer in my hand helped. As the day progressed, I was expecting a lot more push back on being the ‘non-drinker’ of the group. It wasn’t to be the case. It was proving to be easier than I’d expected. Come 6pm on St. Patrick’s day, you start to see the first wave of drunkenness emerge. Many out since noon start hitting the wall. It was a sight to behold and was nice to be on the other side of that for a change.

As the night came to an end, and after switching from zero percent Pauliner to Apple juice, I decided to make what’s known as an Irish-Goodbye! As I left the pub, the party was still in full-swing. I had survived the day. Survived might be too strong a word. I enjoyed a lot of it to be fair. And had made the effort to be there for my mate. We all are keen to do the right thing and keep everyone happy. But it’s key to make sure you’re happy first. Nobody else really can do that for you. I had built up this day in my mind for a few weeks as the first real big test! I am often guilty of overthinking things and this one of these occasions. Anyone could try to hide away for a year but then that wouldn’t really have tested out the experiment. Galway on St. Patricks day could be considered an extreme test. But it was one I learned a lot from.

  1. The Fear still exists.  Just way less.

As I’ve progressed in years, my resilience or ability to recover from a night out or an ‘all day session’ that many of us have been on, has taken many steps backward. You might remember the time when you could socialize two nights at the weekend and be fresh on the Monday. Well, for me at least, those days/nights are long gone! Over the last few years, one night out would take me a few days to recover, and it would need to be a Friday night, so I’d be able to fully function again by Monday. Physically, I’d be pretty ok. Emotionally and Mentally, I’d be fragile. What is known as the fear is just not fun at all. So, I was very much looking forward to not experiencing this phenomenon in 2018.

What I’ve learned here has been interesting. In the past number of years, I would have blamed a moody Monday or even a terrible Tuesday on an excessive night out over the previous weekend. I’d give myself an extra hard time over those days and resolve ‘never again’ and all that goes with that self-defeating attitude. Since the 1st of January, I can now say that sometimes the Mondays or Tuesdays (or even Wednesdays or Thursdays) can still be tough. Never full on fear but still be dotted with anxiety, stress and mild overwhelm. My default, in the past, was to blame it on partying at the weekend. This would/could spiral into self-defeating territory again. Now, with that variable out of the equation, I’ve concluded that it’s ok sometimes not to feel ok. That’s part of being human. Bad days will come. Just accept it and move on.

  1. Win the morning with the rule of 3!

Over the years, wasting mornings, days and time in general has become a big annoyance for me! The older I’ve become; the more appreciation I have for the time I have and how much I can get done with it! So, without doubt, one of the benefits I was expecting and looking forward to with zero days wasted during 2018 was that of increasing productivity and learning new things.

In the last few months, I’ve been able to stick to my morning routine without fail. This has been hugely satisfying. Not only have I been able to get up at 6am (5am for April as it’s the April Challenge), I’ve developed a habit of getting real/deep work done every morning before leaving the house for the day job. This really sets me on fire for the day ahead. I’ve developed a habit, which I’m calling the rule of 3, and it’s paying great dividends. 3 tasks before leaving the house. 2/3 are typically the same and one varies. Like writing this! This has been a big win. Consistently getting stuff done and winning the morning.

#Dry18 is my BHAG for the year (check out my post on goals for the years from December here) and, as I finalise this piece, I’m well into the century. Overall, I’ve been surprised at how smooth it’s been to cut it out. Not easy but totally worth it! In the vast majority of cases, I’ve received great support and words of encouragement. I wanted to challenge myself, first and foremost, to see what life, especially nights out and social events, would be like without any alcohol as the focal point. I wanted to learn or maybe re-learn how to actually have fun and enjoy myself when I’m out completely free of alcohol. It’s been an eye-opening experience so far. Almot 1/3 of the way through, and with the summer sunshine, beer gardens, cold cider, vacations, and many more temptations coming in the next 100 days, I’m sure new challenges and learnings are ahead! Maybe it’s a good thing after all that Ireland didn’t qualify for the World Cup in Russia!

One nice observation that has come in just in the last couple of days is that I seem happier. Much like meditation and it’s benefits, I think others close to you see changes before you do. Upon hearing it, and taking a moment to process it, I would have to agree. That would be number 8 and probably the most important if I could dare include it.

Thanks for reading. I hope you enjoyed it and learned something from it too!


Rob is a qualified Executive Coach and has been Mentoring and Coaching over the last decade in various roles held during his career. In 2017, Rob launched the Rob of the Green Platform which hosts the 1% Better Podcast. Rob currently is a director of strategy and business operations with Dell IT in Cork, Ireland. Rob also publishes articles on productivity, goal setting, meditation, and other topics. 

Connect in with Rob on the socials or via email on the links below:

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Productivity Boosters: 11 of the things that help me get more done!

The last 12 months of my life have been pretty full-on. From completing a Diploma in Executive Coaching, to building up nearly 100 hours in 1–1 Coaching Sessions, starting a new role in the day job, and Creating, Producing and Hosting 50 shows of a Podcast in my ‘spare’ time. I’ve even started to get a bit more frequent with article writing (hence you’re reading this). As I put this piece together, I found myself looking at my whiteboard where I have my key 2017 goals listed out and see that I have just one left to complete, which will get done before 31st December! It’s been a busy but amazingly productive year.
From time to time, in interactions with Friends or Colleagues, I’ve been asked ‘how do I get so much done?’. My usual reply is that I’m not married nor have I kids. My ‘baby’ for 2017 has been the podcast, with a lot of other personal stuff, going on hold.

But there was something in this question that made me reflect on what are the key practices or methods that I use to get stuff done. Over a period of a few weeks, I took some time to brain dump a list of these on the whiteboard. Then reflect on the ones I think make the most impact. I recently released a podcast about the top 11 (EP42 here). I promised that I’d put out a written version too with some links and examples for those that might not have heard the episode or forgot to write the key ones down when listening.

Before diving into the 11 tips, a little on Discipline and Habits. Across the 40+ podcast guests I’ve recorded with, productivity comes up a lot. I’ve learned a lot from the answers. It re-enforced some things for me; a Productivity Hack isn’t real, with a shortcut to success being somewhat mythical. For you to win at increasing your productivity, you need discipline. This is needed for all of the tips below. By applying discipline regularly, you’ll end up creating good habits. Discipline itself could be considered a Habit.

So here it is! My only ask in return for sharing is that you let me know which you like, dislike and if there are others you practice that make a big difference for your own productivity! Get a pen and paper out and let’s go!

1. Set SMART Goals.

Setting a clear target is key. If you haven’t heard of SMART as an approach before, great. As you’ll really find it useful. If you have, be sure to keep using it. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-bound! Let’s use an example. I aimed to release four episodes of my podcast on the launch weekend of 10th March 2017. This was SMART in the following way:
a. Specific — The Podcast Launch
b. Measurable — Four episodes
c. Achievable — I was in control of this (mostly)
d. Realistic — It seemed realistic as I was setting this about three months in advance
e. Time-bound — March 10th 2017 was the date
My habit of goal setting started out way before I become a Project Manager. We all set goals, yet probably not aware of it all the time. I recall that I started setting yearly goals one Christmas in the early 2000s. I was bored out of my mind and decided to set a few big goals for the year ahead. They say creativity can arise out of boredom. That was the case and that time of year to reflect back and look forward. Write them down!

2. Make a Plan

Now you have the goal. The easy part is done. It’s the ‘how’ you get there is the challenging part. This is all about breaking it down into tasks and creating a timeline to do it. For me, this is where the Project Management background helped. It’s using some common sense, plotting out all the steps to get there, putting a level of effort/time on each one, which needs to happen first, dependencies, and lining it all up. Keep it simple. You’re already doing it in lots of ways in everyday life without consciously seeing it as project management. If you have run a marathon, completed a degree or diploma, or built a house, it’s highly likely you’ve planned it out. You can use this planning approach for anything. The goal can be daunting, but break it down. Mini-goals along the way. I’d highly recommend doing some form of Project Management training. These are great life skills to have.
Quick note here. You might have set a goal but when you do the planning, the A, R, or T in the SMART might seem unlikely. That’s ok. Revisit the goal and adjust the date, or aim to still hit the same date with less of the measures (e.g. Podcast launch with two episodes instead of four).
Tools you can use? So many to recommend. Microsoft Excel can be used for building a timeline. An online tool like www.basecamp.com comes highly recommended too. For business, MS Project is good. Test ones out with free trials. If you’re really interested in the Project Management world, email me directly and I’d be happy to discuss other training options.

3. Time to BE! ** WARNING — DISCIPLINE & PATIENCE ESSENTIAL **

The ROI in Meditation is big…if you stick with it!
Since you’ve started reading this article, you’ve probably already looked at your phone at least once and checked your email. And that’s just in the last five minutes. Meditation and Mindfulness can help with that as your focus and concentration will improve. For those that know me or have heard some of the podcast episodes, you’ll know I’m a big advocate of mindfulness. I started properly practicing about two years ago and I’m seeing improvements and benefits in so many ways since then. It takes patience, practice, and testing out what works for you through experimentation. And even with all that, it still might need more digging until it starts to feel like change is happening. What I have found is that others will notice a change in you before you do. Subtle differences. You need to commit to the practice for five-to-six weeks. Commit to it. There is a big Return on Investment. Taking the time to meditate, can calm the mind, give you greater focus and allow you to get more done! There is a great quote, an old Zen Saying that says ‘you should sit in meditation twenty minutes every day unless you’re too busy, then you should sit for an hour!’.
I have a piece I published on the blog that goes deeper into benefits with some useful links to books and guided meditations online. Again, feel free to email if you want to get more specifics. No bad can come out of giving yourself just some time to BE!

4. Deep Work Experimentation

About this time last year, I read a great book called Deep Work by Cal Newport. In it, he talks about Four different time chunks that work well to get real work done. These range from locking yourself away from the world for weeks or months, to four-hour blocks, to shorter stints like thirty minutes. Earlier this year, I was writing a number of assignments. So, I experimented. I found that the four-hour blocks of time worked great for me. It usually took me fifteen minutes to get sucked into the work. Then, I’d find a flow state for a period. Knowing I had this solid block of time squared away was great and allowed me to really focus.
For the more tactical work, that I deal with day-to-day in my work, I use the fifteen to thirty-minute blocks. I’ll touch more on an approach for this further down. Finding out which chunk works best for you by testing it out is the key! And, the improved concentration of number three above helps.

5. Lists, Lists, Everywhere!

I know, you’re awestruck again with this ground-breaking tip! But lists are so powerful for me. Back in 2005 (I remember as I still have the spreadsheet I started out with), I was getting much busier in my work. By becoming a Manager for the first time, my workload increased, and I was finding it hard to keep track of everything. So, I created a rudimentary spreadsheet broken out for the week with a column for each day. I developed a habit, over time, of putting everything that I needed to do in this for that week, or the following week. As the weeks passed, the list structure evolved. I included weekends and broke out tasks into work versus personal. As time went by, and I applied some discipline, it became my system. And it increased my productivity massively.

I continued with the trusty old spreadsheet until about 2015. I had tried a few other tools online but never really found one that was an improvement on what I had. Until I found the tool Trello. This quickly replaced the spreadsheet as it allowed me to track the lists easily on any device. The Usability of it is great. Very simple. What’s great is that when I get an idea or remember something I must do, I just add it to the trello board on the fly and then prioritise it later. This is a huge one for me in enabling me to get more done! To bring my list taking even a little bit further, I recently invested in a dry erase whiteboard that I applied to the wall in my home-office. This is great. I can scribble on the wall when new stuff comes up, wipe it out when done, and just helps to get the stuff out of my head. Decluttering the mind is key and ties into the Meditation point above for sure.

6. The Not To-Do List!

I noticed a few years back that my TDLs (To-Do-Lists) kept getting longer (even more so after finding trello with access on the go). It became overwhelming and it felt like there was always too much to do. I was heaping things on my already full plate. I needed a new way to get clearer on what I needed to stop doing. I’m not certain where I found the idea, I’m definitely not claiming it was my own, but I started to play with moving items from my To-Do to a new list, that I initially called my Stop Doing List. The word ‘Stop’ has a powerful impact. So, I started to comb my lists, spending a few minutes each day (developing the habit) to look at activities that I was doing, or spending time on that were of little or zero value. I used my intuition, a gut check and experience here to help me decide. Now the habit been embedded, I often find myself in the middle of a task or piece of work and realise it wasn’t worth doing, so I stop. A lot of the time, we tend to keep doing the stuff that’s easy or we are comfortable with. It’s hard to stop but you need to have discipline!

7. The Tomato Timer & the Pomodoro Technique

I’ve always liked researching where certain words and phrases originated. When I heard of the Pomodoro Technique, I wanted to know more. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management technique, developed in the 1980s. The Wiki link is in the header above explains all. Using this so simple yet cool approach, I set myself twenty-five minutes to work on a task (PS — I’m using it right now). As I reflect on this one, it brings in a few of my previous tips above. Focus, Deep Work, Time-bound, Specific, Goal focused (albeit micro-goals). It also requires accountability on my side. After the Twenty-five minutes are up, you break for five minutes. And go again.
I’ve been using it more and more. You can download an app for it, or add it to your browser. I’m getting a lot done with this. Be strict with yourself. Stop after twenty-five minutes. You’ll notice your distractions during that time lessen as the practice develops. I love this one.

8. Sweat it out.

I’ve nearly always been semi-addicted to exercise and sport. In whatever form. The days that I don’t exercise are days I feel a bit off, maybe more mentally than physically. Over the last few years, Exercise and Wellness have become even more crucial after I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes in 2012. This was a bit of shell shocker at first. But it has had a positive impact on my wellbeing. From the perspective that I now really have to run, exercise, and keep active to maintain good blood control. For me, it’s a blessing in disguise. Four-to-five times per week, in the gym, out in the fresh air, whatever you can do to get going is all it takes. Besides it being a physical necessity, it’s a productivity one too. I just get more done, have more focus and more energy after getting a sweat on! There is more than enough information out there about Exercise so I’ll keep it to a minimum but it is definitely in my top eleven.

9. The ZEDs!

Ok, so I know this isn’t what you might call a productivity practice. But if you don’t practice sleeping and enough of it, you will not get stuff done. I’m just turned Forty (eek) and in the last few years, I’ve started to value and prioritise sleep almost above all else. If I get too little, I’m ok for a couple of days, but then start getting very edgy, and productivity sinks. I could get away with this in my Twenties and for some of the Thirties. But no longer. If you want to keep high on the output, I’d say for about 90% of us, sleep and the eight hours mark are essential.
Just another interesting learning on sleep I’ve noticed. I keep a journal most days. Normally writing it at night to unload the thoughts rolling around in my skull. I’ve got into the habit of scoring my day out of Ten. Just giving it a gut feel score. I also track the number of hours I sleep each night. It’s interesting to see that the days that score lower correlate with the nights where fewer hours sleep were in line. It’s an interesting observation for me. It might be just coincidence. Test it out for yourself.

10. Circadian Rhythm & Night Owl v Early Bird!

I first heard about the Circadian Rhythm on a podcast a few years back and did some research. It’s a very interesting topic and, for me, it reinforced my lean towards being an Early Bird! Answering this question for me was another big move forward on my getting stuff done continuum. As I said in my podcast on this, up to a couple of years ago, my habit was typically hopping on the couch at around 9pm most evenings after a long day working. I’d flick through the channels, maybe stumble across a Friends re-run and, before realising it, I’m three episodes in, all ones I’ve seen over ten times in the past, and it’s 11pm. It was also around this time that I was trying to get into meditation but couldn’t find the time in the morning. When I managed to get up from slumber, the twenty minutes I had earmarked for mindful breathing had gone! Not only had that nice quiet time I had planned been missed, it meant I was on the back foot for the day and I’d give myself a hard time for not sticking to my plan. Great started to the day, eh? The Busy Mind was only fuelled to be busier. Great start! Sound Familiar.
So, I came up with a two-pronged approach to see if I could beat this. Both very unique! One — go to bed earlier. Two — get up earlier. Both worked great. I sometimes get two+ hours work done before leaving the house (that’s four Pomodoro’s J) and I’m on fire after that.
Find your AM or PM window. And make it your time to do your deep work.
11. Deciding to Decide!
I couldn’t decide whether or not to include this one!! Ha, I tease!
For some, making decisions is easy. For others, it can be painful. It depends on many factors and, I believe, some of that is genetic. But, your approach can be trained to become faster at making the call. If you’re to get more done, learn from mistakes, and grow, then deciding fast can be a game changer.

Taken from the Personality profiler originated by Carl Jung called Insight Discover (check out this free test here), I tend to fall into the Green Zone! A mix of Intuition & Introversion. One that likes to weigh up the options and is slow(er) to make the call. The longer I delay, the harder it gets. It’s true! I can easily think of a number of decisions that I’ve made that I dragged out way too long! But when I commit, I’m all in. So that’s the trade-off. I’m living proof that you can be one personality type by nature, but it can be adjusted with nurture. Through heightened self-awareness, a better understanding of my preferences, and giving myself a deadline, I make the call sooner, with the gut having a big say. I’m right more than I’m wrong and learning faster too.
So that’s my One-to-Eleven! Actually putting the time into writing this, helped me a lot. All of these feel more right for me now than they did when I recorded the podcast on this. That’s reassuring. As I said earlier, I kept this to eleven. I have probably another eleven that I could talk\write about. Since the podcast came out, I’ve heard back from some listeners about ones they use. I love when I get that response. I’d love to hear more so I can include them in a follow-up episode and post. Keep the feedback coming in.
You can hear the podcast or any of my other episodes on www.robofthegreen.ie/episodes/
If you like this article, I’d be grateful if you shared it with others as they might get something from it. Especially around this time of year as folks start to plan out goals for the new year!

Thanks so much & have a very productive day!

Best,
Rob

Connect via my site www.robofthegreen.ie
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Connect via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/robodonohue/

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